King Gardner Family History

Genealogy of the King-McCluskey and Gardner-LeBlanc Families

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251 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Maurice Vigneau and Marguerite Comeau (Page 332):

25 Aug 1722: Record in which Msgr. de Saint-Vallier declared to have absolved Sr Maurice Vigneau, from Port-Toulouse, of the excommunication issued against him by Father Justinien Durand, the vicar-general. Sr Vigneau had advanced publicly certain propositions contrary to the Catholic faith. 
VIGNEAU, Maurice (I1655)
 
252 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Pierre Comeau and Rose Bayon (Page 84):

Pierre Comeau had two sons who bore the given name Pierre; one was known as Pierre the elder, nicknamed "’l'Esturgeon” (the Sturgeon), and the other as Pierre the younger, nicknamed "des Loups-Marins” (of the Seals). Several miles above the fort, there was on the Annapolis River a spot that was called in the eighteenth century "’l'Esturgeon.” The nickname given to Pierre Comeau the elder derived from that place, because that is where he settled. 
COMEAU DIT L'ESTURGEON, Pierre l'aîné (I697)
 
253 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Abraham Boudrot & Cécile Melanson (Page 40):

Abraham Boudrot from Port-Royal was one of those who, during the War of the League of Augsburg (1689-1697), obtained passes from Commandant Villebon. Boudrot had traded regularly with Boston since the 1680's and had gained the friendship and respect of many Massachusetts merchants … 
BOUDROT, Abraham (I390)
 
254 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Jean Belliveau & (1) Jeanne Bourg & (2) Cécile Melanson (Page 20):

ca 1721: He emigrated to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, from where he went, in 1728, to Tracadie, Île St. Jean. The children of his first marriage stayed behind at Port-Royal. 
BELLIVEAU, Jean (I696)
 
255 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Martin Bourg & Marie Potet (Page 50):

18 July 1701: Martin Bourg, a resident of Cobeguit, sold a homestead situated along the Rivière du Dauphin (Annapolis River), on the estate of the late M. ’d'Entremont, to Nicolas Babineau dit Deslauriers. 
BOURG, Martin (I439)
 
256 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Pierre Arseneau & (1) Marguerite Dugas & (2) Marie Guérin (Page 6):

Pierre Arseneau's place of origin is unknown. He seems to have arrived at Port-Royal after the census of 1671; perhaps he was among the sixty persons brought to Acadia from Rochefort in 1671 on the ship ’L'Oranger. He was a coastal pilot. In 1686, he resided at Port-Royal but owned property at Beaubassin.

25 April 1723: Marie, widow of the late Pierre Arseneau, was the godmother of François Arseneau's daughter Marie-Marguerite. 
ARSENEAU, Pierre (I581)
 
257 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for René (de) Forest & Françoise Dugas (Page 134):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, René Forest from Port-Royal received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
FOREST, René (de) (I3355)
 
258 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for Germain Doucet (Pages 112-113):

Explanatory Notes

i. It is impossible for the mother of Germain Doucet's children to have been a sister of Jacques Bourgeois's wife [Jeanne Trahan born about 1629, daughter of Guillaume Trahan and Françoise Corbineau who married July 13 1627 in St. Étienne, Chinon, Touraine], as some writers have claimed, considering that Bourgeois's father[-in-law] and mother-in-law were only married in 1627. It is nevertheless possible that Germain Doucet married secondly Guillaume Trahan's daughter, who subsequently gave him no children who survived in Acadia, but it is also possible that his second wife was Jacques Bourgeois's sister and not his wife's sister.

Biographical Notes

14 July 1640: Inquiry presided over by Mathieu Cappon, clerk and registrar, against Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at which appeared Germain Doucet dit La Verdure, "master-at-arms at Pentagouet”, Isaac Pesseley, and Guillaume Trahan.

16 Aug 1654: Capitulation of Port-Royal:
Result of all the articles presented by M. Doucet de La Verdure, on the one hand as captain commanding for the King in Port Royal, and on the other as surrogate guardian of the minor children of the late M. ’d'Aulnay, to Mr. Robert Sedgwick, general of the squadron and Commander-in-chief on all the coast of New England in America … and to better ensure the keeping of the above articles the said Sr de La Verdure has left as hostage M. Jacques Bourgeois, his brother-in-law and the lieutenant of the place, as well as the bearer of his power of attorney with respect to the present treaty.

Germain Doucet and Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois were brothers-in-law. According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes (Pages 251-253), Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois was only married to Jeanne Trahan; he was never married to a Doucet. Thus, Germain Doucet must have married a sister of Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois or a sister of Jeanne Trahan so that Germain Doucet and Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois became brothers-in-law. There is no current evidence for the number of wives Germain Doucet had or when they were married.

According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes (Page 1537), Guillaume Trahan sailed to Acadia on the Saint Jehan along with his wife and two children. One of these children was Jeanne Trahan who married Jacques dit Jacob Bourgeois. Possibly, the other child was a daughter who married Germain Doucet. However, even if this second daughter of Guillaume Trahan did marry Germain Doucet, it can not be determined which, if any, children of Germain Doucet were hers.

Stephen A White's Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes 1636-1714 Ajouts et Corrections corrects Germain Doucet's place of birth to "Couperoue en Brye (Coupru en Brie)". There is no indication where this in France.

According to Wikipedia, there is a commune Coupru located in Essômes-sur-Marne (Canton), Château-Thierry (Arrondissement), Aisne (Département), Hauts-de-France (Région), France. This may the place recorded as Germain Doucet's place of birth. 
DOUCET, Sieur de La Verdure Germain (I342)
 
259 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Antoine Belliveau and Andrée Guyon (Page 19):

We do not know Antoine Belliveau's place of origin, nor the date of his arrival in Acadia. As the names Belliveau and Guyon (or Guillon) appear many times in the parish registers of La Chaussee (Poitou), it is possible that Antoine came from that region.

According to Bona Arsenault's History of the Acadians (1994; ISBN 2-7621-1745-3) Page 38:

After having carefully examined the church registers of La Chaussee near the village of ’d'Aulnay, in France, Genevieve Massignon wrote [in Les parlers francais ’d'Acadie] that more than half of the acts entered in the registers from 1620 to 1650 concern family names that are found in the 1671 census in Acadia: Babin, Belliveau (Belliveaux), Bertrand, Bour (Bourg, Bourque), Brault (Breaux), Brun (Lebrun), Dugast (Dugas), Dupuis (Dupuy), Gaudet, Giroir (Girouard), Landry, LeBlanc, Morin, Poirier, Raimbaut, Savoie (Savoy), Thibodeau (Thibodeaux); others such as Blanchard, Guerin and Terriot (Theriault, Theriot) live in the same region of France.

Lengthy research by Genevieve Massignon also shows that the French families who migrated to Acadia between 1636 and 1650, were recruited by ’D'Aulnay from the vast seigneuries that he and his mother owned in the region of Loudunais, France. 
BELLIVEAU, Antoine (I299)
 
260 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Families Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Pierre Lejeune dit Briard and fille Doucet (Page 223):

i. The dispensation for the fourth degree of kindred granted upon the marriage of Claude Trahan, grandson of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, to Anne LeBlanc (Rg GP 18 July 1746) can only be explained by supposing that the paternal grandmother of Claude's mother was a sister of one of Anne's great-grandparents. In examining the list of these great-grandparents (namely Daniel LeBlanc, Françoise Gaudet, Abraham Dugas, Marguerite Doucet, Michel Boudrot, Michelle Aucoin, Jean Belliveau, and Jeanne Bourg), one observers that the most probable connection would be between Pierre Lejeune's mother and Abraham Dugas's wife Marguerite Doucet. It is by this means that it has been deduced that the wife of Pierre Lejeune dit Briard Senior was Germain Doucet's daughter. Note also that the nickname Briard means originally from Brie, whence Germain Doucet supposedly also came, and that both Pierre Lejeune dit Briard Junior and Martin Lejeune had sons named Germain. 
DOUCET, femme (I4476)
 
261 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 1206), Philippe Mius ’d'Azy married married two First Nations women: an unidentified woman about 1678 and Marie (with no known surname) about 1687. Philippe had 5 children with his first wife and 9 with his second. MIUS D'AZY, Philippe (I420)
 
262 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 1295), Catherine Bugaret died during a voyage to Boston to negotiate an exchange of prisoners. BUGARET, Catherine (I1796)
 
263 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 1567), Paul Vigneau dit Laverdure was a soldier "de la compagnie de Maximy au regiment de Carignan".

According to the La Societe des Filles du roi et Soldats du Carignan website (http://www.fillesduroi.org/src/regiment.htm) regarding the Carignan-Salieres Regiment:

The pleas of the colonists of New France for assistance in their struggle with the Iroquois were answered in 1665 with the arrival of the first French regular troops in Canada, the Carignan-Salières Regiment. Between June and September 1665, some 1200 soldiers and their officers arrived in Québec, under the leadership of Lt. General Alexander de Prouville, Sieur de Tracy.

The series of forts established by the Regiment along the Richelieu River, along with the success of its second campaign into the land of the Mohawk Indians, led to a long period of peace for the colony, which permitted it to prosper. However, King Louis XIV's plan included the permanent settlement of many of the soldiers and officers in Canada. Over 450 of these troops remained in the colony, many of whom married the newly arrived filles du roi.



The term "Carignan-Salières regiment” should be taken to include the 20 companies that formally made up the regiment plus the four companies (Berthier, La Brisandière, La Durantaye and Monteil) that arrived in Canada with the Marquis de Tracy. The reason is simple: while only the first 20 companies can truly be called members of the Carignan-Salières regiment, all 24 companies came over at the same time, with the same mission, under the same command structure and were all demobilized at the same time and given the same benefits and incentives to settle in Canada.  As such, we can refer to them as one group, and the easiest way to refer to this group is by the name that identifies the majority.

By "Canada,” we mean the French colony in the Saint Lawrence Valley.  The term "New France” encompasses a larger area, and includes the Mississippi Valley/Louisiana and also Acadia.

The La Societe des Filles du roi et Soldats du Carignan website records the marriage of Paul Vignault (Vignau) and Françoise Bourgeois. 
VIGNEAU DIT LAVERDURE, Paul (I3819)
 
264 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 418), the initial Acadian Coste is François Coste who married Madeleine Martin about 1695. The DGFA records François Coste and Madeleine Martin having 2 sons who married and had families - Jacques (dit Jacob) and Jean, as well as 2 sons for whom no wife or family is recorded - François and Pierre.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in L'Ardoise records Jean Coste age 38 Coaster native of Port Royal, wife Madeleine Lafargue age 29 native of Petit Degra, and children François age 11, Pierre age 9, Jean age 6, Étienne age 6 months, and Genevieve age 3.

Marriages for François (to Anastasie Cyr), Pierre (to Nanette Vigneau), Jean (to Anastasie Hébert), and Étienne (to Magdeleine Hébert) are recorded in the Miquelon Parish Register between 1766 and 1777. As well, François, Pierre, Jean, and Étienne are all recorded in the 1784 Census of St. Pierre and Miquelon.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in Port Toulouse records Jacques Coste age 47 Builder native of Port Royal, wife Françoise Petitpas age 45 native of la Cadie, and son Claude age 22.

Father Bailly's Register records baptisms for the following children of Claude Coste and Marguerite Vignot (sic) on July 26 1771 at Arichat, Isle Madame:

Jean 10 years born 15 November
Agnès 7 years born 1 April
Julienne 6 years born 6 June
Felicien 4 years born 4 April
Barbe 3 years born 23 January

According to Stephen A. White's article Fondateurs de la Paroisse d'Arichat Cap-Breton, Julienne dite Hélène Coste, daughter of Claude Coste and Marguerite Vigneau, married François Prévost about 1784.

The only Coste family contained in the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes is François Coste and Madeleine Martin, and the DGFA only records 2 of their sons with families - Jacques (dit Jacob) and Jean. All of the known sons of Jean Coste reside in Miquelon during and after the period of Father Bailly's Register until at least 1784.

So, it is reasonable to believe Claude Coste who married Margaret Vigneau is the son of Jacques Coste and Françoise Petitpas. Claude's presence in the 1752 Census as the son of Jacques Coste and Françoise Petitpas serves as confirmation. 
COSTE, Claude (I3276)
 
265 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 987), Joseph LeBlanc died as an infant (although he is recorded in the 1693 Census of Les Mines at age 5). LEBLANC, Joseph (I3438)
 
266 According to the Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes 1636-1714 (Page 223), Madeleine Bourg's marriage to Pierre Maisonnat dit Baptiste was annulled as Pierre Maisonnat dit Baptiste was already married. Family F1737
 
267 According to the Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes 1636-1714 (Page xx), the registers for Cobeguit began before 1728 and were lost. I do not know the original source for Jeanne Bourgeois' death on April 8 1740 in Cobeguit. So, her date and place of death are questionable. BOURGEOIS, Jeanne (I584)
 
268 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Abraham Landry & Marie Guilbeau (Page 199):

25 Aug 1714: In letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Abraham Landry from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
LANDRY, Abraham (I366)
 
269 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Antoine Landry & Marie Thibodeau (Page 195):

2 Oct 1702: Report by Mathieu de Goutin in which Antoine Landry is mentioned as one of the first residents of Les Mines. 
LANDRY, Antoine (I300)
 
270 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Claude Landry & (1) (Marie-)Catherine Thibodeau & (2) Marie Babin & (3) Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère (Page 196):

2 Oct 1702: Report by Mathieu de Goutin in which Claude Landry is mentioned as one of the first residents of Les Mines. 
LANDRY, Claude (I301)
 
271 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for François LeBlanc & Marguerite Boudrot (Page 217):

François LeBlanc and his wife (Marguerite Boudrot), with Simon and Élisabeth, were at Shirley Point and at Needham, Massachusetts, in 1756. The Widow François LeBlanc was at "Boston” on August 24, 1763, and then at Miquelon in 1767. 
LEBLANC, François (I4192)
 
272 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Germain Thériot & Anne Richard (Pages 313-314):

23 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Germain "terry” and his family, from Les Mines, received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. From the fact that Pierre Richard is mentioned right after this Germain Thériot, it seems clear that this was Anne Richard's husband, rather than the one who married Anne Pellerin. 
THÉRIOT, Germain (I2948)
 
273 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Jean Gaudet & (1) unidentified wife & (2) Nicole Colleson (Page 139):

1671: "The oldest inhabitant of Port-Royal …, the venerable doyen of the colony, was Jean Gaudet, then aged ninety-six years.”

According to Bona Arsenault's History of the Acadians (1994; ISBN 2-7621-1745-3) Page 38:

After having carefully examined the church registers of La Chaussee near the village of ’d'Aulnay, in France, Genevieve Massignon wrote [in Les parlers francais ’d'Acadie] that more than half of the acts entered in the registers from 1620 to 1650 concern family names that are found in the 1671 census in Acadia: Babin, Belliveau (Belliveaux), Bertrand, Bour (Bourg, Bourque), Brault (Breaux), Brun (Lebrun), Dugast (Dugas), Dupuis (Dupuy), Gaudet, Giroir (Girouard), Landry, LeBlanc, Morin, Poirier, Raimbaut, Savoie (Savoy), Thibodeau (Thibodeaux); others such as Blanchard, Guerin and Terriot (Theriault, Theriot) live in the same region of France.

Lengthy research by Genevieve Massignon also shows that the French families who migrated to Acadia between 1636 and 1650, were recruited by ’D'Aulnay from the vast seigneuries that he and his mother owned in the region of Loudunais, France. 
GAUDET, Jean (I191)
 
274 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Jean Maillet dit Passepartout & Marie-Madeleine Dufaux (Page 239):

25 Oct 1720: Contract binding out Marie Maillet, aged twelve years, daughter of the late Jean Maillet and Madeleine Dufaux, who had married secondly Laurent Gourdet, to serve Madame de Beaucour, "for all the time until she shall become an adult”. 
MAILLET DIT PASSEPARTOUT, Marie-Angélique (I4075)
 
275 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Jean Poirier & Jeanne Chebrat (Page 282):

7 May 1641: Account of all that I have paid to the sailors and soldiers of the crew of the ship Le Saint François, which left on May 7, 1641, for the third time.

Names of the sailors who received money and have finished and been placed in the King's service.

Jehan Poirier, also absent … [who] had received in advance the sum of £ 36:0:0.

"We have read this document … and it could effectively concern the ancestor of the Poiriers of Acadian Lineage in all probability.” 
POIRIER, Jean (I628)
 
276 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Jean Thibodeau & Marguerite Hébert (Page 321):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Jean "tibodos” from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
THIBODEAU, Jean (I3156)
 
277 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Michel Hébert & Isabelle Pellerin (Page 167):

25 Aug 1714: In letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Michel "aimbert” from Port-Royal (sic) received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
HÉBERT, Michel (I3374)
 
278 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Noël Pinet & Rose Henry (Pages 279-280):

Biographical Note

19 June 1714: The inhabitants of Acadia who went to see the land on Île Royale aboard Bernard Marres dit LaSonde's sailing vessel included Rose Pinet (sic), with one child, from Les Mines, bound "for Canada”. 
HENRY, Rose (I1883)
 
279 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Philippe Mius & Madeleine Hélie (Page 256):

ca 1651: Philippe Mius ’d'Entremont came to Acadia with his wife and daughter as adjutant to Governor Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour and commandant in the colony during the latter's absence.

17 July 1653: He received, jointly with Pierre Ferrand, by letters patent from Charles de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, the fief of Pobomcoup, at Cape Sable.

— — 1670: He became King's attorney.

20 July 1684: In his capacity as attorney, he signed an order of the King that was registered at Port-Royal.

5 Oct 1678: He signed an attestation in favour of the accomplishments of Governor ’d'Aulnay.

— — 1688: He was replaced as attorney by Pierre Chênet Dubreuil who had received the retainer for the office on September 23, 1687.

31 July 1699: Deposition of Sr de Tenville (sic for Teinville), taken before Mathieu de Goutin, about the statements of Sr ’d'Entremont, residing at Les Mines, concerning the boundaries of Acadia.

23 Dec 1707: Letter from Mathieu de Goutin to the Minister:
Sr Philippe Mius ’d'Entremont, a native of Normandy, who died seven years ago at the age of ninety-nine years and some months, with all his teeth, had been adjutant under the late M. de La Tour, governor of this country. He had since been obliged to carry out the duties of King's attorney for eighteen years, and had only left off because of his great age.

According to The Acadians of Nova Scotia Past and Present by Sally Ross and Alphonse Deveau (Pages 19-20):

When Charles de La Tour returned from France in 1651, he brought back several families who were prepared to settle in Acadie. The most well-known in this group were Madeleine (nee Helie) and Philippe Mius ’d'Entremont. They arrived in 1651 and by 1653 were settled in Cape Sable where Philippe ’d'Entremont had been granted the barony of Pombomcoup (Pubnico). Several other families established themselves in Cape Sable with the ’d'Entremonts, at least one of which came from La Rochelle. … ’D'Entremont's eldest daughter, Marguerite, married Pierre Melanson who founded Grand Pre in 1682. 
MIUS D'ENTREMONT, Sieur d'Entremont and Baron de Pobomcoup Philippe (I416)
 
280 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Pierre Landry & Madeleine Broussard (Page 199):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Pierre Landry from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
LANDRY, Pierre (I1722)
 
281 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Pierre Landry & Marguerite Forest (Page 204):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Pierre Landry the younger from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
LANDRY, Pierre (I3131)
 
282 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Pierre Melanson dit Laverdure & Priscilla — (Page 247):

According to Joseph LeBlanc dit Le Maigre's deposition at Belle-Île-en-Mer, his wife's maternal grandfather, Pierre Melanson (the son) had "come to Port-Royal from Scotland”. According to the research of Father Clarence ’d'Entremont cited above, however, Pierre (Melanson dit) Laverdure (the father) was a French Protestant who married, during his exile in England, an Englishwoman named Priscilla. Brought to Acadia with his family by Thomas Temple in the spring of 1657, Pierre, his wife, and their youngest son withdrew to Boston after the Treaty of Breda in 1667. Their two other sons, already married to Acadian women, remained in Acadia. La Mothe-Cadillac relates that in 1685 he saw these two brothers, whom he calls Scotsmen, aged sixty and sixty-five years, who were married to French women. In 1692 he saw their mother, then aged ninety years, at Boston.

According to the Devoe - deVaux Family History (Page 122), Pierre Melanson "was a French protestant who fled France for England around 1628 to escape Roman Catholic persecution. He m. ca. 1630 an English woman known only to us as "Pricilla" but there is speculation that her surname was Melanson, the name adopted by her husband in New France, albeit when he moved to New England to escape "... the wrath of the countrymen papists" in Acadia he used the name Laverdure. He and his wife both d. in Boston, he around 1676, she in 1691." 
MELANSON DIT LAVERDURE, Pierre (I321)
 
283 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Pierre Richard & Marguerite Landry (Page 290):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Pierre Richard and his family, from Les Mines, received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
RICHARD, Pierre (I511)
 
284 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Prudent Robichaud & Henriette Petitpas (Page 295):

5 April 1727: Prudent Robichaud was appointed justice of the peace at Port-Royal.

1 Dec 1733: Prudent Robichaud was named collector of quit-rents.

8 Dec1755: According to P. Gaudet, Prudent Robichaud embarked on the Pembroke, destined for exile in North Carolina. The ship was taken over by its Acadian prisoners, who drove it into the Saint John River. 
ROBICHAUD, Prudent (I3315)
 
285 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for René LeBlanc and Anne Bourgeois (Page 210):

2 Oct 1702: Report by Mathieu de Goutin in which René LeBlanc is mentioned as one of the first residents of Les Mines. 
LEBLANC, René (I187)
 
286 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for Yvon Richard & (1) Marie-Madeleine Doucet & (2) Françoise Durand (Page 291):

27 March 1678: Yvon Richard, a waterman, from St-Gilles sur Vie, bound himself to work for three years, at 170 lives per year, eighty livres plus fifteen livres in advance, for Jean Gitton, who was acting for Sr Richard Denys, a merchant at Québec. 
RICHARD, Yvon (I112)
 
287 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Note for — Potet & Marie Gautrot (Page 285):

The first husband of Marie Gautrot might perhaps have been the Swiss Jean Potet dit La Fortune, from Lucerne, an indentured employee of La Tour. This Jean Potet, who had been born about 1624, bound himself to come to Acadia at the age of nineteen, in 1643. 
POTET, homme (I2980)
 
288 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Abraham Gaudet & (1) Agnès Girouard & (2) Marie Breau (Page 142):

— — 1711: Abraham Gaudet from Beaubassin set up an ambush, which resulted in his taking prisoner an English messenger from the Annapolis garrison.

9 Jul 1714: Among the inhabitants of Acadia who went to view land on Île Royale were Charles Arseneau, François Arseneau, and Abraham Gaudet, all from Chignectou.

25 Aug 1714: In letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Abraham Gaudet from Beaubassin received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”.

29 Aug 1723: Abraham Gaudet, an inhabitant, was among the witnesses at the burial of Pierre Neau at Port-Lajoie. 
GAUDET, Abraham (I476)
 
289 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Bernard Marres dit La Sonde & Judith Petitpas (Page 242):

18 Jan 1710: Sale of a sailing vessel by Sr Jean Chevalier, a merchant residing at Pleasance, to Srs Antoine Paris, Bernard Marres, and François Perraut, all residents of Pleasance; Bernard signed "Marres”.

25 Aug 1712: Power of attorney given by Sr Bernard Marres dit LaSonde, a surgeon residing at "Mascodaboit” in Acadia, to Sr Antoine Paris, merchant, concerning a sailing vessel belonging to Claude Petitpas; he signed "Marres dit Lassond”.

19 June 1714: Amomg the inhabitants of Acadia who went to view land on Île Royale was Bernard "Mars” dit Lasonde, from Mouscoudabouet, with a ship, a crew of three men, and eleven passengers.

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, "Lasonde” from Acadia received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
MARRES DIT LA SONDE, Bernard (I3303)
 
290 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Charles dit Charlot Landry & Catherine-Josèphe Broussard (Pages 200-201):

25 Aug 1714: In letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Charles Landry from Port-Royal received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”.

— — 1720: Charles Landry was one of the six deputies chosen by the inhabitants of Port-Royal.

16 Sep 1727: In concert with Guillaume Bourgeois and Abraham Bourg, he refused to take the oath of allegiance to King George II. The three delegates were imprisoned for "alleged opposition”.

14 Oct 1727: Charles Landry became dangerously ill, and his wife requested the Council's permission to bring him home where he could be better looked after, but the Council refused, saying he was "a very Great Offender”. 
LANDRY, Charles dit Charlot (I312)
 
291 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Claude Landry & Marguerite Thériot (Page 196):

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from L'Hermite at Louisbourg, "Glaude” Landry from Port-Royal received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King". 
LANDRY, Claude (I350)
 
292 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Claude Petitpas & (1) Marie-Thérèse & (2) Françoise Lavergne (Page 276):

— — 1716: Description of Île Royale, by Jacques ’L'Hermite:
" A man named Petitpas [is the] grandson of one named Bernard du Gueret [sic], dit St-Martin, a native of Bordeaux, who was settled at Mirligueche. between La Heve and Chibouctou … by [order of] the gentlemen of the Company about eighty years ago; this harbour was given him by the King, and the papers are recorded in the registry of Canada.”

30 June 1720: The Legislative Council of Massachusetts granted him, at his request, the sum of one hundred pounds for having secured the freedom of some English captives by paying their ransom with his own money. The Council further resolved that the government would pay the tuition fees for one of his sons at Harvard College.

From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Volume II (1701-1740) located at www.biographi.ca/en/bio/petitpas_claude_2E.html

PETITPAS, CLAUDE, schooner captain, interpreter, known particularly for his collaboration with the English, third child of a family of 15, son of Claude Petitpas, Sieur de Lafleur, clerk of the court at Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal, N.S.), and of Catherine Bugaret; b. c. 1663 at Port-Royal, d. some time between 1731 and 1733.

During his youth Petitpas was closely associated in his voyages and activities with the Micmacs in the neighbourhood of Port-Royal, where he lived in his father's home until his marriage. Around 1686 he married an Indian girl of that tribe named Marie-Thérèse, born in 1668, by whom he had at least seven children, according to the 1708 census. On 7 Jan. 1721, after his first wife's death, he remarried, again at Port-Royal; his second wife was Françoise Lavergne from that town, daughter of Pierre Lavergne, Father Breslay's servant, and of Anne Bernon. She was only 17; he was about 57. She bore him four children.

While his first wife was alive Petitpas lived at Mouscoudabouet (Musquodoboit), where the Boston fishermen were active; as early as 1698, complaints arose about his association with them. In September 1718, a frigate sent from Boston by the governor of Massachusetts and commanded by Captain Thomas Smart anchored in Canso (Canseau) harbour. The English seized a fair number of French fishermen, among them Marc La Londe, the son-in-law of Claude Petitpas. The latter placed his own schooner at the disposal of the English so that they might better carry out their plan.

On 30 June 1720 the legislative council of Boston, at his request, granted him the sum of £100 for having shown "tender regard . . . to sundry English captives in the late Indian War”; he had gone so far as to obtain their liberty by paying their ransom out of his own pocket. The council further resolved that the government would pay the tuition fees of one of his sons for four years at Harvard College.

He probably went to live subsequently on Île Royale (Cape Breton Island), perhaps at Port-Toulouse (St Peters, N.S.) itself, where several of his children had settled. In 1728 Joseph de Brouillan, dit Saint-Ovide [Monbeton*], governor of Île Royale, went there to conduct an inquiry into the loyalty of the Indians towards the French. Claude Petitpas was apparently trying to influence the Indians, particularly the young ones, in favour of the English. Saint-Ovide therefore tried to send him to France towards the end of that same year, with two of his sons by his first marriage, in order to get rid of him. If this plan was in fact carried out, Claude Petitpas does not seem to have been absent more than two years.

He died probably some time between 1731 and 1733: his last known child was born in 1731; moreover, in May 1733 the king gave his widow a sum of money for services rendered by her husband in his capacity as interpreter. In 1747 Governor Shirley of Massachusetts called Petitpas a "faithfull subject of the crown of Great Britain . . . [who] had received marks of favour from this government for his services.”

Clarence J. ’d'Entremont
AN, Col., B, 59, f.516; C11B, 3, 4, 10, ff.67–69; Section Outre-Mer, G1, 466 (Recensements de ’l'Acadie, 1671, 1686). Newberry Library, Ayer Coll., La Chasse census (1708). PANS, MS docs., XXVI (parish register of Port-Royal), f.63. The acts and resolves, public and private, of the province of the Massachusetts bay (21v., Boston, 1869–1922), IX. Coll. doc. inédits Canada et Amérique (CF), III (1890), 165–68. Coll. de manuscrits relatifs à la N.-F., III, 38–39, 379. NYCD (O'Callaghan and Fernow), IX, 912. Arsenault, Hist. et généal. des Acadiens, I, 442, 477. Coleman, New England captives. Harvey, French régime in P.E.I., 215. McLennan, Louisbourg, 62–63. Murdoch, History of Nova-Scotia, I, 243. 
PETITPAS, Claude (I1739)
 
293 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Claude Thériot & Marie Gaudet (Page 312):

5 Oct 1687: Claude Thériot was one of the signers of an attestation in favour of the accomplishments of Governor ’d'Aulnay. The Thériot family had thus arrived in Acadia before 1650, the year of ’d'Aulnay's death. 
THÉRIOT, Claude (I369)
 
294 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for David Basset & Marie Melanson dit Laverdure (Page 16):

" In 1680, but before her marriage to Captain William Wright, the widow Priscilla Melanson had borrowed from her granddaughter Marie Melanson the sum of forty pounds, with the promise that the latter would receive, after her death, all the household and personal goods that she had and that she was going to bring with her into the home of her new husband, Captain William Wright. But when the grandmother did die … the widower William Wright wanted to hear nothing of his late wife's granddaughter Marie. It was then that Marie Melanson and her husband David Basset brought suit against Captain William Wright … on January 22 1692 …” 
UNKNOWN, Priscilla (I322)
 
295 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for François Gautrot & (1) Marie — and (2) Edmée (Aimée) Lejeune (Page 145):

3 Oct 1687: François Gautrot signed an attestation in favour of the accomplishments of Governor ’d'Aulnay; he had thus arrived in Acadia before 1650, the year of ’d'Aulnay's death. 
GAUTROT, François (I371)
 
296 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Germain Landry & Marie Melanson (Page 198):

25 Aug 1714: In letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Germain Landry from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
LANDRY, Germain (I306)
 
297 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Jacques LeBlanc & Catherine Landry (Page 212):

19 June 1714: Among the inhabitants of Acadia who came to view land on Île Royale were François Coste and Jacques LeBlanc, with their sailing vessel, a crew of two men, and six passengers.

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, "jacques leBlan” from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
LEBLANC, Jacques (I406)
 
298 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard (Page 115):

25 June 1714: Jean Doucet from Les Mines was among the inhabitants of Acadia went with Father Gaulin to view land on Île Royale.

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Jean Doucet from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”.

The 1752 Census of Île St. Jean in Rivière du Nord-Est records Le Sieur Amand Bugeaud Senior age 51 Negotiator and Navigator native of ’L'acadie 4 years in the country, wife Dame Claire Doussets age 37 native of the same, no children, and Francoise Blanchard mother of said Dame.

The absence of Jean Doucet from this Census suggests he may have died before the 1752 Census. 
DOUCET, Jean (I4317)
 
299 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Mathieu de Goutin & Jeanne Thibodeau (Pages 155-156):

20 Aug 1688: Michel Boudrot surrendered to him the office of (King's) general representative for justice in Acadia, pursuant to an order from the King dated March 31, 1687.

c.a. 1689: According to the very words of Governor de Menneval, he was married "foolishly to a peasant's daughter”.



— — 1710: After the surrender of Port-Royal, he returned to France with his family.

1 Jan 1714: He was appointed King's scrivener on Île Royale.

12 Sept 1715: Petition of Jeanne Thibodeau, widow of the King's scrivener Mathieu de Goutin, who died December 25, 1714, leaving eleven minor children, requesting the election of a guardian for them. 
DE GOUTIN, Mathieu (I3155)
 
300 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Pierre (de) Forest & Cécile Richard (Page 134):

25 Jun 1714: Pierre Forest from Les Mines was among the inhabitants of Acadia who went with Father Gaulin to view land on Île Royale.

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, Pierre Forest and his son from Port-Royal (sic) received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”. 
FOREST, Pierre (de) (I2968)
 

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