King Gardner Family History

Genealogy of the King-McCluskey and Gardner-LeBlanc Families

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Matches 301 to 350 of 3,324

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301 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Pierre LeBlanc & (1) Marie Thériot & (2) Madeleine Bourg (Page 211):

Pierre is the only one of Daniel LeBlanc's sons who remained at Port-Royal. He inherited the family home situated at the Pree-Ronde, nine miles above the fort at Port-Royal.

6 June 1707: Pierre LeBlanc, captain of the militia, was wounded in the thigh, during one of the skirmishes between the French under the command of M. de Subercase and the New Englanders, according to a letter from M. Labat dated July 6, 1707.

6 Dec 1730: Madeleine Bourg, widow of Pierre LeBlanc, was the godmother of Élisabeth Bourgeois (Rg PR). 
LEBLANC, Pierre (I1635)
 
302 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for René LeBlanc & (1) Élisabeth (Isabelle) Melanson & (2) Marguerite Thébeau (Pages 214-215):

17 Dec 1744: The Council of Nova Scotia decided to suspend Alexandre Bourg from the post of notary and to appoint René LeBlanc in his place.

1749: Thomas Pichon Papers:

M. LeLoutre had René LeBlanc taken prisoner by the Indians in his own home, which he then had them pillage. His son Simon was brought along with him. M. LeLoutre sent the father to Beausoleil's place on the Petitcodiac and the son as a messenger to Canada, where he had him detained. He had the father held for nearly two years; the Indians made him suffer a great deal; it was December 25th when they made him come from Les Mines. Later they made his wife and some of his children come, too. This woman, seeing her husband thus detained, and hearing M. LeLoutre say he would not go back, died of chagrin. 
LEBLANC, René (I330)
 
303 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for Roger dit Jean Caissie and Marie-Françoise Poirier (Page 68):

20 March 1682: Roger Quessy's name appears on the record of La Vallere's allotment to his tenants.

Prosecution of Jean Campagna, 1685: Depositions of Roger Kessy, of Irish nationality, a resident of Beaubassin, aged about thirty-five years, and of Marie Kessy, aged sixteen years; deposition of Françoise Poirier, aged thirty-six years.

The DGFA Additions and Corrections contains the following Biographical Note for Roger dit Jean Caissie (Page 306 - Apr 2011):

8 May 1756: Extract of a letter written from Louisbourg by René Gauthier de Varennes to a friend at La Rochelle:
... the Cartys [sic]... descended from one Roger John-Baptist Carty [sic], an Irish Roman-Catholic. He had been an indented [sic] servant in New-England, and had obtained at length his discharge from his master, with permission to remain with the French Acadians for the freer exercise of his religion (traduit et publié dans An Account of the Customs and Manners of the Micmakis and Maricheets... from an Original French Manuscript Letter..., Londres, 1758, p 105).

The 1714 Census of Beaubassin records Jean Kessis (sic) "le pere", wife Marie Poirier, and daughter Anne. 
CAISSIE, Roger dit Jean (I170)
 
304 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for [Pierre-]Alain Bugeau (Page 67):

Alain Bugeaud, his wife, and seven of their children were among the Acadian families who disappeared without a trace after 1758. Following a thorough investigation of the matter, it is presumed that they were among the unfortunate passengers on board one of the two English transports that were lost at sea. 
BUGEAUD, Alain (I3179)
 
305 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Biographical Notes for [Pierre-]Alain Bugeau (Page 67):

Pierre-Alain Bugeaud was listed at Grand-Pré in 1701, as the surgeon at Les Mines in 1703, and as carrying out the functions of notary in 1705.

The Dictionnaire Généalogique des Familles Acadiennes 1636-1714 Ajouts et Corrections (Page 301) records for Alain Bugeaud "n/b Rg Bois (temple protestant)" followed by his birth and baptism dates. Alain Bugeaud’s father Daniel Bugeaud is recorded as "notaire à St-Ciers-du-Taillon". It is possible Alain Bugeaud was born in St-Ciers-du-Taillon rather than Bois. They are about 8 km apart. 
BUGEAUD, Alain (I3019)
 
306 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for François Coste and Madeleine Martin (Page 94):

Explanatory Notes

i. In the parish registers of Ste-Madeleine de ’l'Île , preserved in the municipal archives of Martigues, there may be seen under the date of March 7, 1673, the baptismal record of François Coste, son of Étienne Coste and Josèphe Vincent (information communicated by Lloyd Boucher and Ralph DeCoste of Tracadie, N.S.). Is this the same man who married Madeleine Martin about 1695? A careful examination of the registers of this parish failed to discover any other François Coste who was born there around the same time (communication from Marcel Barriault).

Biographical Notes

19 June 1714: Among the inhabitants of Acadia who came to view land on Île Royale were François Coste and Jacques LeBlanc, with their sailing vessel, a crew of two men, and six passengers.

25 Aug 1714: In a letter from ’L'Hermite at Louisbourg, François Coste from Les Mines received permission "to settle on Île Royale at the good pleasure of the King”.

1717: A very capable navigator, François Coste managed during a storm to enter a vessel into Port-Toulouse, while Pierre Morpain, the colony's port captain could not do so.

1 Aug 1718: He received the commission of coastal pilot.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in L'Ardoise records Francois Coste age 90 "natif de la paroisse de Marteque eveche de Marseilles" in the colony 30 years, wife Madeleine Martin age 89 native of Port Royal, and grandchildren Joseph Dugas age 21 and Madeleine Dugas age 12.

The 1752 Census states the family of Sr Coste took refuge in ’L'Ardoise during the last war with the English. 
COSTE, François (I3045)
 
307 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for François Coste and Madeleine Martin (Page 94):

Explanatory Notes

ii. Joseph Dugas and Madeleine Dugas were living in the household of their grandfather François Coste at the time of the 1752 Census. It seems that the only one of François's daughters who could have been Joseph and Madeleine's mother was Marguerite. It is through this line of reasoning that it has been concluded that it was Marguerite who married Joseph Dugas about 1725.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in L'Ardoise records François Coste age 90 "natif de la paroisse de Marteque eveche de Marseilles" in the colony 30 years, wife Madeleine Martin age 89 native of Port Royal, and grandchildren Joseph Dugas age 21 and Madeleine Dugas age 12.

The 1752 Census states the family of Sr Coste took refuge in ’L'Ardoise during the last war with the English. 
DUGAS, Joseph (I4478)
 
308 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for François Coste and Madeleine Martin (Page 94):

Explanatory Notes

ii. Joseph Dugas and Madeleine Dugas were living in the household of their grandfather François Coste at the time of the 1752 Census. It seems that the only one of François's daughters who could have been Joseph and Madeleine's mother was Marguerite. It is through this line of reasoning that it has been concluded that it was Marguerite who married Joseph Dugas about 1725.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in L'Ardoise records François Coste age 90 "natif de la paroisse de Marteque eveche de Marseilles" in the colony 30 years, wife Madeleine Martin age 89 native of Port Royal, and grandchildren Joseph Dugas age 21 and Madeleine Dugas age 12.

The 1752 Census states the family of Sr Coste took refuge in ’L'Ardoise during the last war with the English. 
DUGAS, Madeleine (I1759)
 
309 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for Guillaume Gaudet & Marie Boudrot (Page 143):

Explanatory Note

At the time of the 1752 Census, Charles Gaudet, Jean Gaudet, Pierre Bernard, Paul Bernard, and Charles Deveau, Guillaume Gaudet's sons and sons-in-law were all together at Tintamarre.

Biographical Note

28 June 1714: Guillaume Gaudet, his wife, and their children in a charroi, along with Denis Gaudet and Bernard Gaudet from Port-Royal, were among the inhabitants of Acadia who went to view land in Île Royale. 
GAUDET, Guillaume (I828)
 
310 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory and Biographical Notes for Simon Pelletret & Perrine Bourg (Page 273):

Explanatory Note

François Gautrot, Guillaume Trahan, Jean Blanchard, Simon Pelletret, and Michel Boudrot are all named on the list of expropriations in 1705 as the owners of lots "adjoining the side of the old fort”. Four out of five of these persons were among the first colonists at Port-Royal, Trahan for example having arrived aboard the Saint Jehan in 1636 and Boudrot having been syndic at Port-Royal in 1639. By 1705, all four had long since been dead, and it must be supposed that at the time of the expropriations their heirs were the actual owners of these lots. It may be presumed that it was the same with Simon Pelletret. Given that no male bears this name in any of the Acadian censuses beginning in 1671, it would appear this Simon must have been Perrine Bourg's first husband. Simon Pelletret would thus have received, along with François Gautrot, Guillaume Trahan, Jean Blanchard, and Michel Boudrot, one of the first grants at Port-Royal, close to the fort.

Biographical Note

2 Dec 1705: Expropriation of a lot, adjoining the side of the old fort, and belonging to Simon Pelletret, for the extension of the fort at Port-Royal. As Simon Pelletret apparently had been dead for many years in 1705, one must suppose that his heirs were then the actual owners of this land. 
PELLETRET, Simon (I115)
 
311 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note and Biographical Note for Philippe Pinet & Catherine Hébert (Page 279):

Explanatory Note

Given that Philippe Pinet was the head of the only family of the name in Acadia until the marriage of his son Antoine in 1709, it may be presumed that all the Pinets who were born in Acadia down to that year, including Isabelle Michel's husband, were his children.

Biographical Note

19 June 1714: The inhabitants of Acadia who went to see the land on Île Royale aboard Bernard Marres dit LaSonde's sailing vessel included the widow Catherine "Aibert”, with four children, from Les Mines, bound "for Canada”. 
PINET, Philippe (I3371)
 
312 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Claude Landry & Madeleine Doucet (Page 203):

The godparents of the children of Vincent Landry and Marguerite Boudrot included Madeleine Doucet, Judith Landry, and Madeleine Landry. This makes it clear that Marguerite Boudrot's husband belonged to Claude Landry's family. 
LANDRY, Claude (I4434)
 
313 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Jean Maillet dit Passepartout & Marie-Madeleine Dufaux (Page 239):

According to the 1752 Census, Jean Maillet was born at Plaisance. At the time of his birth, there was only one Maillet family there, that of Jean Maillet and Madeleine Dufaux. It has thus been inferred that the man who later became Claire Langlois's husband was their son.

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in Petit de Grat records Jean Majet (sic) age 35 Fisherman native of Plaisance, wife Claire Langlois age 47 native of Isle Madame, and children Jean Marie age 12, Jean Pierre age 8, François age 6, a fourth son not named, and Marie age 3; residing Petit de Grat.

Jean Majet is the only Maillet, Mayet, Majet, Myet, or variant spelling recorded in the 1752 Census of Île Royale. Jean Pierre Maillet (as the husband of Marie Magdeleine Boudrot) and François Maillet (as the husband of Louise Poirier) are recorded in Father Bailly's Register. 
MAILLET, Jean(-Baptiste) (I744)
 
314 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Jean Thériot & an unidentified wife (Page 313):

The name of Jean Thériot Junior's wife is unknown. Nevertheless, it is clearly indicated in the 1671 census that he was already married by that time. He evidently settled elsewhere, as did several other children of the first colonists of Acadia. 
THÉRIOT, Jean (I433)
 
315 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Jean-Baptiste Forest & Marie-Élisabeth Labarre (Page 135):

According to a tradition, preserved by the elders of Memramcook, Jean-Baptiste Forest, husband of Élisabeth LaBarre, was the seigneur of Menoudie before the Expulsion, and had nine children … 
FOREST, Jean-Baptiste (I3361)
 
316 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Marie Sallé (Page 303):

In abstracting information from the vital records of La Rochelle, Genevieve Massignon found the record of Martin Aucoin's marriage to Marie Sallé, daughter of the late Denys Sallé and Françoise Arnaud of the parish of Cougnes (Rg St-Barthélemy de La Rochelle 20 Jan 1632). The 1671 census mentions Marie Sallé, aged sixty-one years, as the widow of the late Jehan Claude. Could she have been the mother of Martin Aucoin of Grand-Pré? In 1671 and 1678, she resided in the household of François Bourg, who had married Marguerite Boudrot, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Michelle Aucoin. In 1686, she lived among the Landrys. Was there some relationship between her and the René Landry who married Marie Bernard? 
SALLÉ, Marie (I3029)
 
317 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Perrine Bourg (Page 48):

It has not been possible to determine whether there was a family relationship between Perrine Bourg and Antoine Bourg, below. The absence of any dispensation for kindred in the marriages of Charles Savoie, grandson of Antoine's daughter Marie Bourg, to Françoise Martin, granddaughter of Jeanne Pelletret (Rg PR 16 Jan 1730), and of Michel Bourg, grandson of Antoine's son François Bourg, to Brigitte Martin, another granddaughter of Jeanne Pelletret (revalidated Rg St-Suliac 7 July 1764), seems to show that Perrine and Antoine were not sister and brother.

According to Bona Arsenault's History of the Acadians (1994; ISBN 2-7621-1745-3) Page 38:

After having carefully examined the church registers of La Chaussee near the village of ’d'Aulnay, in France, Genevieve Massignon wrote [in Les parlers francais ’d'Acadie] that more than half of the acts entered in the registers from 1620 to 1650 concern family names that are found in the 1671 census in Acadia: Babin, Belliveau (Belliveaux), Bertrand, Bour (Bourg, Bourque), Brault (Breaux), Brun (Lebrun), Dugast (Dugas), Dupuis (Dupuy), Gaudet, Giroir (Girouard), Landry, LeBlanc, Morin, Poirier, Raimbaut, Savoie (Savoy), Thibodeau (Thibodeaux); others such as Blanchard, Guerin and Terriot (Theriault, Theriot) live in the same region of France.

Lengthy research by Genevieve Massignon also shows that the French families who migrated to Acadia between 1636 and 1650, were recruited by ’D'Aulnay from the vast seigneuries that he and his mother owned in the region of Loudunais, France. 
BOURG, Perrine (I116)
 
318 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Pierre Landry & Madeleine Broussard (Page 199):

Before the Dispersion Elizabeth Thériot's daughter Marie-Josèphe Landry resided up the Petitcodiac River near the settlement of Joseph and Alexandre Broussard. It would seem that she chose this place of residence because of some sort of family relationship to the Broussards. It therefore seems probable that Marie-Josèphe was Madeleine Broussard's grand-daughter, and thus the grandniece of Joseph and Alexandre Broussard. 
LANDRY, Marie-Josèphe (I1708)
 
319 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for Pierre Pouget (Pochet) dit Lapierre & Madeleine Broussard (Page 286):

Despite the numerous inaccuracies surrounding the entry for "Jean-Baptiste Lapierre” in the 1726 census at Port-Toulouse, it would appear all the same that this was in fact Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre, because at the time there was no other Lapierre families of Acadian origin, except those of François and Jacques Lapierre, who never went to live on Île Royale.

Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre may have been born in "St-Hippolyte, eveche de Clermont en Auvergne", France as recorded in the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes (Page 1348). This phrase in his marriage record may imply it is Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre who is from, and so was born in, this parish. 
POUGET DIT LAPIERRE, Pierre (I78)
 
320 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Note for René Landry the elder and Perrine Bourg (Pages 194-195):

After a study of the dispensations granted upon the marriages of the descendants of the Landry's, it appears that the first two René Landrys in Acadia could not have been more nearly related than in the second to the third degree. Compare, for example, the lack of any dispensations in the records of the marriages of Germain Dupuis, son of Marie a René Landry the younger, to Marie Granger, granddaughter of Marie a René Landry the elder (Rg GP 3 Nov 1717), and of Charles Lanoue, son of Marie a René Landry the elder, to Marie-Josèphe Landry, daughter of Charles a René Landry the younger (Rg GP 12 June 1729).

According to Bona Arsenault's History of the Acadians (1994; ISBN 2-7621-1745-3) Page 38:

After having carefully examined the church registers of La Chaussee near the village of ’d'Aulnay, in France, Genevieve Massignon wrote [in Les parlers francais ’d'Acadie] that more than half of the acts entered in the registers from 1620 to 1650 concern family names that are found in the 1671 census in Acadia: Babin, Belliveau (Belliveaux), Bertrand, Bour (Bourg, Bourque), Brault (Breaux), Brun (Lebrun), Dugast (Dugas), Dupuis (Dupuy), Gaudet, Giroir (Girouard), Landry, LeBlanc, Morin, Poirier, Raimbaut, Savoie (Savoy), Thibodeau (Thibodeaux); others such as Blanchard, Guerin and Terriot (Theriault, Theriot) live in the same region of France.

Lengthy research by Genevieve Massignon also shows that the French families who migrated to Acadia between 1636 and 1650, were recruited by ’D'Aulnay from the vast seigneuries that he and his mother owned in the region of Loudunais, France. 
LANDRY, René l'aîné (I436)
 
321 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Antoine Chebrat & Françoise Chaumoret (Pages 75-76):

i. There is no proof that the same Jeanne Chebrat who was baptized at La Chaussee in 1627 was in fact the wife of Jean Poirier and Antoine Gougeon. It is all the same quite possible that this was the same person, considering that the Brun family in Acadia was originally from the same parish. Furthermore, the Chebrat and Brun families were possibly connected by marriage, because Vincent Brun's wife was a Breau and Jeanne Chebrat's sister Philippe married the widower of a Breau.

ii. Jean LeBlanc dit Dérico's deposition at Belle-Île-en-Mer makes his wife Françoise Blanchard out to have been a descendant of Guillaume Blanchard and Huguette "Poirier”. This is a double error. First, Françoise was in fact the granddaughter of this Guillaume's brother, rather than Guillaume's direct descendant. Secondly, Guillaume Blanchard's wife was Huguette Gougeon, rather than Huguette Poirier. Why did Jean LeBlanc confuse the family names Poirier and Gougeon? It must be supposed that it was because of a close connection between the two families. It was probably from this that Placide Gaudet was able to deduce that the Poiriers and Huguette Gougeon had the same mother, Jeanne Chebrat. 
CHEBRAT, Jeanne (I629)
 
322 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Antoinette Landry (Page 194):

i. The dispensation for the fourth degree of kindred granted upon the marriage of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry's great-grandson Charles Belliveau to René the elder and Perrine Bourg's great-granddaughter Marguerite Granger (Rg GP 3 Nov 1717) shows that Antoinette and René were sister and brother, considering that the absence of any such dispensations when the great-grandchildren of Simon Pelletret and Perrine Bourg intermarried with those of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry eliminates the possibility that Antoine Bourg and Perrine Bourg were brother and sister. See the explanatory note about Antoine Bourg and Perrine Bourg accompanying the Bourg family (between nos 1 and 2).

[This explanatory note regarding Antoine Bourg and Perrine Bourg (Page 48) is recorded in the Notes for Perrine Bourg.]

ii. The lack of any dispensations for kinship in the marriage records of Antoinette Landry's great-grandson Jean Daigre to Claude a René Landry the younger's daughter Madeleine Landry (Rg GP 6 Nov 1721), of Pierre a René Landry the younger's son François Landry to Antoinette Landry's great-granddaughter Dorothée Bourg (Rg GP 21 Nov 1731), and of Antoine a René Landry the younger's son Joseph Landry to Dorothée's sister Marie-Josèphe Bourg (Rg GP 11 Jan 1745), indicates that René Landry the younger was neither Antoinette's brother nor her nephew.

According to Bona Arsenault's History of the Acadians (1994; ISBN 2-7621-1745-3) Page 38:

After having carefully examined the church registers of La Chaussee near the village of ’d'Aulnay, in France, Genevieve Massignon wrote [in Les parlers francais ’d'Acadie] that more than half of the acts entered in the registers from 1620 to 1650 concern family names that are found in the 1671 census in Acadia: Babin, Belliveau (Belliveaux), Bertrand, Bour (Bourg, Bourque), Brault (Breaux), Brun (Lebrun), Dugast (Dugas), Dupuis (Dupuy), Gaudet, Giroir (Girouard), Landry, LeBlanc, Morin, Poirier, Raimbaut, Savoie (Savoy), Thibodeau (Thibodeaux); others such as Blanchard, Guerin and Terriot (Theriault, Theriot) live in the same region of France.

Lengthy research by Genevieve Massignon also shows that the French families who migrated to Acadia between 1636 and 1650, were recruited by ’D'Aulnay from the vast seigneuries that he and his mother owned in the region of Loudunais, France. 
LANDRY, Antoinette (I384)
 
323 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Jean Hébert & (1) Marie-Marguerite Landry & (2) Marguerite Leprince (Page 168):

i. The list of Jean Hébert's heirs who paid quit-rents at Cobeguit in 1754, cited above, provides the names of five of Jean's sons and five of his sons-in-law. 
HÉBERT, Jean (I1826)
 
324 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Jean Landry & Cécile Melanson (Page 197):

Cécile Landry and her children were among the Acadian families on Île St-Jean who disappeared without a trace after 1758. Following a thorough investigation of the matter, it is presumed that they were among the unfortunate passengers on board one of the two English transports that were lost at sea. 
LANDRY, Cécile (I318)
 
325 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Jean-Baptiste Landry & Marguerite Gaitrot (Page 202):

i. At the time of La Roque's census in 1752, Jean-Baptiste Landry and Marguerite "Boucherut” were living in the midst of their sons Joseph, Alexis, and Jean-Baptiste. Note that the Jean "Daigle” who lived in their household was in fact Jean Dingle.

Jean-Baptiste's name is included on the Oath Petition, signed December 23, 1729, and the Oath of Allegiance, signed by over 600 Acadians from the Mines, Coquebid, Pisiguit and Beaubassin villages, in April 1730. (Chapter 2, Acadian Biography: The Landry Ancestors)

The 1752 Census of Île Royale in Rivière aux Habitants records Jean Bapte Landry age 60 Plowman native of la Cadie, wife Marie Goutraut (?) age 59 native of Pepeguit (sic), and nephew Jean Daigle age 20 and niece Margueritte Landry age 18 natives of la Cadie.

The 1767 Census of Miquelon (available at the ’L'Arche Musee et Archives website) records:

Joseph Landry, veuf de Marie Breau, venu de Chedabouctou age 51
Anne Landry, sa fille age 27
Alexandre Landry, son fils age 13
Baptiste Landry, son pere, veuf de Marie Boudrot age 76

The 1767 Census of Saint Pierre and Miquelon for Departing Acadians records Joseph Landry, his daughter Anne, his son Alexandre, and his father Jean-Baptiste. But Jean-Baptiste's wife Marguerite Gautrot is not recorded, indicating she has died.

According to Paul C. Landry's ’L'Ardoise, Cape Breton, Nova scotia website (located at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pclandry/Lardoise/):

The Landry family in Cape Breton descends through 2 distinct branches of the family tree. The River Bourgeois Landrys descend from Pierre Landry. He was deported to France. Lists of 1761 and 1762 show Pierre at La Rochelle, France. By this time he had married Anne Clergé, daughter of Claude Clergé and Françoise Lavergne. Anne had been at Port Toulouse, Île Royale, about 1742.

On Isle Madame, the largest line of Landry's descend from Jean-Baptiste Landry and Marguerite Gauterot. Sixty-two year old Jean-Baptiste Landry with three of his sons (38 year old Jean-Baptiste, 35 year old Joseph, and 27 year old Alexis) and a group of grandchildren, came to Cape Breton during August of 1751, specifically Rivière aux Habitants. They did not stay long at that location. Their sons, Alexis Landry, married to Marguerite Aucoin, Joseph Landry, married to Marie Marguerite Breau, and Jean Baptiste dit L'Abbe Landry, married to Marie Josephe LeBlanc soon settled the Isle Madame area. Most of the Isle Madame Landry's can trace their roots to this branch of the Landry family.

It is interesting to note, this branch of the Landry's who came to Cape Breton, came voluntarily, and came before the deportations took place.

The Landry's who settled in L'Ardoise descend from both these branches to the family. Michael Landry who married Elizabeth/Isabella Marchand is a descendant of the Isle Madame Landry family. His grandfather was Alexis Landry who married Marguerite Aucoin. Most of the L'Ardoise Landrys can trace their roots through this branch of the family.

The second branch of the L'Ardoise Landry family descends through Pierre Landry and Anne Clerge. This line of the family is the lineage most of the River Bourgeois Landry's, including myself, can trace their roots through. Their grandson, Pierre Landry who married Susanne Mombourquette, had ties to the River Bourgeois and L'Ardoise areas. Several of their descendants settled in the L'Ardoise area.

Stephen A. White does not identify Jean-Baptiste Landry, husband of Marguerite Gautrot, as one of the "fondateurs" signing the March 8 1786 letter to J.F.W. DesBarres. Perhaps Jean-Baptiste Landry had died or, being about 95 years old, was unable to sign. 
LANDRY, Jean-Baptiste (I77)
 
326 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Explanatory Notes for Robert Henry & Marie-Madeleine Godin (Page 177):

i. Marie Henry, her husband, five of her children, more than thirty of their grandchildren, and many of their great-grandchildren were among the Acadian families on Île St-Jean who disappeared without a trace after 1758. Following a thorough investigation of the matter, it appears that Marie's husband Noël Doiron was the aged leader of the Acadians of Pointe-Prime who is mentioned (but not named) in Captain Nicholls' account concerning the wreck of the Duke William. According to this account, the old man and all his family perished when the ship sank in the sea. 
HENRY, Marie (I4235)
 
327 According to the Dictionnaire Genealogique Des Familles Acadiennes English Supplement Secondary Source for Michel (Gereyt) (de) Forest & (1) Marie Hébert and (2) Jacqueline (Jacquette) Benoit (Page 133):

Vincent-de-Lerins …

As the archives of Amsterdam and Leyden contain no mention of Gereyt de Forest after his birth, neither a record of his marriage, nor of his burial, nor any other document in which he might have appeared; and that furthermore the archivists of these cities are inclined to believe that he left the country for America, as other members of his family did;

Considering further that this Gereyt de Forest is never mentioned in the censuses of Port-Royal, or of other places, in Acadia; — it seems very clear that on occasion of his conversion to Catholicism, for he was a Huguenot, Gereyt took a saint's name, that of Michel, as his patron and also in memory of his great-grandfather, Michel Maillard, who had not passed over to Calvinism. 
FOREST, Michel (Gereyt) (de) (I3353)
 
328 According to the Known History of the Goodyear Family Presently Living at Grand Falls written by Josiah Goodyear in 1964 or 1965:

… so they packed up all and moved into Cat Harbour and settled on the South Point, now known as Lumsden South …

It was there they started to marry up with a Gibbons family who had arrived there with some comely maidens …

FamilySearch’s Newfoundland Vital Statistics, 1753-1893 records baptisms of the following Gibbons in Greenspond Church of England:

1. Charlotte age 10 baptized April 18 1830 (no parents or place of birth recorded)
2. Mary age 16 born Cat Harbour, daughter of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons, baptized August 14 1832
3. Anne age 15 born Cat Harbour, daughter of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons, baptized August 14 1832
4. Jane age 14 born Cat Harbour, daughter of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons, baptized August 14 1832
5. Amelia age 7 born Cat Harbour, daughter of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons, baptized August 14 1832
6. Matthew age 3 born Cat Harbour, son of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons, baptized August 14 1832
7. Thomas age 16 born Cat Harbour baptized September 4 1832 (no parents recorded)
8. Harriet age 7 born Cat Harbour baptized September 18 1833 (no parents recorded)

Their approximate years of birth are:

Thomas about 1816
Mary about 1816
Anne about 1817
Jane about 1818
Charlotte about 1820
Amelia about 1825
Harriet about 1826
Matthew about 1829

As there is only one Gibbons family in Cat Harbour for the 1836 Census, it is reasonable to believe Thomas Gibbons and Harriet Gibbons, both born Cat Harbour, are children of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons.

Greenspond Church of England records the marriage of Thomas Gudcher (sic) of Cat Harbour and Charlotte Gibbons of Cat Harbour on October 23 1843.

Again, there is only one Gibbons family in Cat Harbour for the 1836 Census and a Charlotte Gibbons of Cat Harbour marries in 1843. It is reasonable to conclude Charlotte Gibbons, wife of Thomas Gudger, is the daughter of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons and Charlotte age 10 baptized April 18 1830. 
GIBBONS, Charlotte (I3548)
 
329 According to the Known History of the Goodyear Family Presently Living at Grand Falls written by Josiah Goodyear in 1964 or 1965:

… so they packed up all and moved into Cat Harbour and settled on the South Point, now known as Lumsden South …

It was there they started to marry up with a Gibbons family who had arrived there with some comely maidens …

See Notes for Charlotte Gibbons, wife of Thomas Gibbons, for the baptisms of Gibbons in Greenspond Church of England from FamilySearch’s Newfoundland Vital Statistics, 1753-1893.

The approximate years of birth for the daughters of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons are:

Mary about 1816
Anne about 1817
Jane about 1818
Charlotte about 1820
Amelia about 1825
Harriet about 1826

The 1836 Census of Cat Harbour records only one Gibbons family; namely Matthew Gibbons Planter with 2 Males under 14, 2 Males 14-60, 1 Female under 14, 4 Females 14-60, and 4 Servants.

There are 5 Females residing with Matthew Gibbons in 1836; likely his wife Mary Ann and 4 daughters.

Josiah Goodyear states "they [the Gudger’s who settled in Cat Harbour] started to marry up with a Gibbons family who had arrived there with some comely maidens”. This implies more than one Gudger married a Gibbons daughter.

The older Gibbons daughters missing from the 1836 Census may have married and so reside with their husbands. Daughter Anne is a candidate to be the wife of John Gudger. 
UNKNOWN, Anne (I3577)
 
330 According to the Known History of the Goodyear Family Presently Living at Grand Falls written by Josiah Goodyear in 1964 or 1965:

… so they packed up all and moved into Cat Harbour and settled on the South Point, now known as Lumsden South …

It was there they started to marry up with a Gibbons family who had arrived there with some comely maidens …

See Notes for Charlotte Gibbons, wife of Thomas Gibbons, for the baptisms of Gibbons in Greenspond Church of England from FamilySearch’s Newfoundland Vital Statistics, 1753-1893.

The approximate years of birth for the daughters of Matthew and Mary Ann Gibbons are:

Mary about 1816
Anne about 1817
Jane about 1818
Charlotte about 1820
Amelia about 1825
Harriet about 1826

The 1836 Census of Cat Harbour records only one Gibbons family; namely Matthew Gibbons Planter with 2 Males under 14, 2 Males 14-60, 1 Female under 14, 4 Females 14-60, and 4 Servants.

There are 5 Females residing with Matthew Gibbons in 1836; likely his wife Mary Ann and 4 daughters.

Josiah Goodyear states "they [the Gudger’s who settled in Cat Harbour] started to marry up with a Gibbons family who had arrived there with some comely maidens”. This implies more than one Gudger married a Gibbons daughter.

The older Gibbons daughters missing from the 1836 Census may have married and so reside with their husbands. Daughter Mary is a candidate to be the wife of William Gudger. 
UNKNOWN, Mary (I3587)
 
331 According to The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland, 1868, originally publlished by Virtue & Co., London:

ST. PANCRAS, a parish and extensive suburban district of London, in the Holborn division of the hundred of Ossulstone and borough of Marylebone, county Middlesex, 2½ miles N.W. of St. Paul's. It contains the Euston-square terminus of the London and North-Western railway; the King's-cross terminus of the Great Northern; the new terminus of the Midland Counties railway, now in course of construction; the Chalk-farm junction station of the North London, West London Extension, and London and North-Western lines; also the several stations on the North London and Metropolitan lines. This important parish comprises 2,600 acres, lying between Maiden-lane, Tavistock-square, Regent's-park, Primrose-hill, and Caen-wood, and includes the populous hamlets of Camden, Kentish, and Somers towns, King's-cross, and parts of Haverstock-hill and Highgate.

SOMERS TOWN, a chapelry in the parish of St. Pancras, county Middlesex, 2 miles N.W. of St. Paul's Cathedral, London. This place, about 40 years ago, was built over, and became a populous suburb. The living is a perpetual curacy in the diocese of London, value £400, in the patronage of the vicar. The church is a modern edifice. See Pancras, St. 
GARDNER, Priscilla (I2426)
 
332 According to the Registres des Acadiens de Belle Isle en Mer within the Collection de Documents inédits sur le Canada et l'Amérique (Volume III Page 52), the children of Claude Babin and Marguerite Dupuis include, but are not limited to:

Claude Babin (married Marie Cormier)
Jacques Babin (married Marie Bourgeois)
Bazile Babin (married Marie Soigniey)
Joseph Babin (Marinne LeBlanc)
Anne-Marie Babin (married Alain LeBlanc)
Laurent Babin (married Marie-Françoise Carriere)
Charles Babin (not yet married)

According to the Registres des Acadiens de Belle Isle en Mer within the Collection de Documents inédits sur le Canada et l'Amérique (Volume II Page 177), they also have a daughter Marguerite who is Joseph LeBlanc's second wife.

It is puzzling that, in her deposition, Marguerite Dupuis did not mention all of her children. 
BABIN, Claude (I4858)
 
333 According to the Western Bay and Blackhead Methodist Church Records available from the Poingdestre/Puddester/Puddister Family Tree website (www.pudnewfoundland.ca/index.html), there is a burial for John King of Bradley's Cove on July 6 1824 in Western Bay Methodist. No age or other information is recorded.

There is a burial for John King age 18 of Western Bay on July 29 1828. John's age at and year of death imply he was born about 1810, making him the likely son of James King and Mary Crowley of Western Bay.

John King and Ann Pike? had children baptized in 1830 and 1833. So this John King was not buried in 1824.

So, who is John King buried on July 6 1824? He is very likely the son of John and Ann King, or the son of William and Eleanor King.

Newfoundland's Grand Banks 1835 Voters List for Bradley's Cove records William King Senior and John King. Presumably, if John's son John was still alive in 1835, then John would also be recorded as "Senior". So, it seems reasonable to believe it is John and Ann King's son John who was buried in 1824. 
KING, John (I2583)
 
334 According to their Marriage Certificate, Isabell and George were married in the City of Los Angeles by Rev. Eli Fay of the Church of the Unity (which is now the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles). Both Isabell and George were residents of the City of Los Angeles at the time of the marriage. The witnesses were Edna Stevens and Emma Hayden, both residents of the City of Los Angeles. There is no mention of Isabell's parents - George Gardner and Frances Marrett - in the Marriage Certificate. Family F1094
 
335 According to Thomas Goodyear's email dated December 20, 2000:

I briefly met Louise King some 30 plus years ago. My parents, Valentine and Elsie Goodyear, were staying at the same seniors home. They were friends and my interest was sparked when Louise mentioned that her mother was named Henrietta GOODYEAR. That day I made a note in my book to the effect that and I quote "Mrs Pilgrim, St. Lukes Home, ne" Louise King, her mother's maiden name was Henriette Goodyear of Catalina. L.K's grandfather was Jim Goodyear. She had uncles Jim and George. L.K's grandfather Jim m. ..... Pike of Harbour Grace 
KING, Aloe Louisa (k.a. Louise) (I1117)
 
336 Adelaide Fougère's age is recorded as follows in various Censuses and her Death Registration:

1861 Census age 20-30, implying a year of birth about 1830-1840
1871 Census age 36, implying a year of birth about 1834-1835
1881 Census age 48, implying a year of birth about 1832-1833
1891 Census age 58, implying a year of birth about 1832-1833
1901 Census age 66, born July 12 1834
1911 Census age 76, born July 1834
1922 Death Reg’'n age 88, born about 1833-1834

Adelaide Fougère's ages are quite consistent, and it seems reasonable to believe her date of birth recorded in the 1901 Census is accurate. 
FOUGÈRE, Adelaide (I1908)
 
337 Agnes Coats, wife of William Pate and Peter McArthur, is born about 1803-1805 based on the 1851 and 1861 Censuses of Kilbarchan and her Death Registration. She is born in Glasgow based on the 1851 and 1861 Censuses of Kilbarchan.

In Thomas Pate's Death Registration, informant and brother in law Malcolm Campbell records Agnes Coats' father as James Scott and his occupation as Quarryman. His surname is in error, but perhaps Malcolm Campbell was correct about his forename and his occupation.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland record only one baptism for an Agnes Coats in Lanarkshire between 1795 and 1810. She is Agnes, daughter of John Coats and Isobel Watson, born or baptized September 1 1810 in Glasgow. The year of birth for this Agnes Coats is inconsistent with the implied year of birth for Agnes Coats, wife of William Pate and Peter McArthur, and with being married to William Pate in June 1824. She can be eliminated as a candidate.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland record baptisms for the following Agnes Coats in Renfrewshire between 1795 and 1810.

1. Agnes, daughter of James Coats and Elizabeth Langmuir, baptized August 29 1801 in Abbey Church of Scotland. It seems likely this Agnes died before the baptism of James Coats and Elizabeth Langmuir's second daughter named Agnes below.

2. Agnes, daughter of James Coats and Elizabeth Langmuir, baptized December 25 1803 in Paisley Middle Church of Scotland and Abbey Church of Scotland.

3. Agnes, daughter of James Coats and Elizabeth McIntayer, baptized December 2 1805 in Abbey Church of Scotland.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland do not record the father's occupation for baptisms in Abbey, Renfrewshire during the 1800-1810 period. But, father's occupations are (at least sometimes) recorded for baptisms in Glasgow, Lanarkshire.

James Coats and Elizabeth Langmuir had 3 daughters (Elizabeth and 2 Agnes') baptized in Abbey, Renfrewshire and then 2 sons (James and William) baptized in Glasgow, Lanarkshire.

The baptism for James, son of James Coats and Elisabeth Langmuir, at Glasgow records father James' occupation as Quarrier.

Agnes Coats' place of birth seems to be Abbey, Renfrewshire as her baptism occurred there. Her parents then moved to Glasgow, Lanarkshire. So, it is understandable Agnes thought she was born in Glasgow as she likely grew up there, and so stated this to the Census enumerators.

It is reasonable to conclude Agnes, daughter of James Coats and Elisabeth Langmuir, is Agnes Coats, wife of William Pate and Peter McArthur as:

1. Agnes' father's forename is James and his occupation is Quarrier
2. Agnes' year of birth is consistent
3. Agnes resides in Glasgow from an early age, although she was likely not born there
4. There seem to be no other Agnes Coats candidates born in Glasgow about 1803-1805

The date and place of birth for James Coats, husband of Elisabeth Langmuir, are not known. As he married in Renfrewshire, it is reasonable to first examine baptisms of James Coats in Renfrewshire. But the baptism of James Coats, husband of Elisabeth Langmuir, may not be recorded in Renfrewshire or in the available ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland baptisms for Renfrewshire.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland record baptisms for 3 James Coat(e)s in Renfrewshire between 1760 and 1785:

1. James, son of George Coats and Katherine Haywood, baptized October 2 1774 in Abbey
2. James, son of James Coates and Anne McLean, baptized September 26 1775 in Greenock New or Middle
3. James, son of George Coats and Agnes Clydesdale, baptized March 12 1784 in Abbey

ScotlandsPeople Statutory Registers records the death of James Coats age 82 Thread Manufacturer, son of George Coats and Catherine Heywood, on August 19 1857 at 11 Back Row, Ferguslie, Paisley, Renfrewshire. The Informant is James' son George Coats. James Coats' wife is not recorded. James Coats, husband of Elisabeth Langmuir, is a Quarrier/Quarryman. James Coats and Elisabeth Langmuir have no known children named George or Katherine. It is reasonable to conclude James Coats, husband of Elisabeth Langmuir, is not the son of George Coats and Katherine Haywood.

James, son of George Coats and Agnes Clydesdale, was 16 at the time of the marriage of James Coats and Elisabeth Langmuir in 1800, and so is a less likely candidate to be the husband of Elisabeth Langmuir.

So, of these 3 known James Coates/Coats baptized in Renfrewshire between 1760 and 1785, the likeliest candidate is the son of James Coates and Anne McLean. James Coats and Elisabeth Langmuir named their first son James, but do not have a daughter Anne.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland records the marriage of James Coatts and Anne McLean, daughter of John McLean, on February 10 1766 in Greenock New or Middle Parish, Renfrew.

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland records baptisms for the following children of James Coat(e)s and Anne McLean in Greenock New or Middle Parish, Renfrew:

1. Janet baptized April 30 1767
2. Thomas baptized September 5 1768
3. John baptized October 16 1774

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland record baptisms for 7 James Coat(e)s in Lanarkshire between 1760 and 1785:

1. James, son of James Coats (no mother recorded), baptized December 9 1764 in Blantyre
2. James, son of James Coats and Elisabeth Russel, baptized March 31 1765 in Cambusnethan
3. James, son of John Coats and Agnes Hamilton, baptized September 22 1765 in East Kilbride
4. James, son of John Coats and Janet Watson, baptized April 9 1767 in Glasgow
5. James, son of William Coats (no mother recorded), baptized May 23 1781 in East Kilbride
6. James, son of James Coats (no mother recorded), baptized August 3 1784 in Blantyre
7. James, son of Thomas Coats (no mother recorded), baptized April 3 1785 in Blantyre

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland record one baptism for James Coat(e)s in Wigtownshire between 1760 and 1785:

1. James, son of William Coats (no mother recorded), baptized June 21 1773, in Leswalt

ScotlandsPeople Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland does not record a burial for a James Coats in Renfrewshire between 1808 and 1854. According to the GENUKI website, Old Parish Registers Church of Scotland only record burials in Abbey (Paisley) from 1759 to 1826. 
COATS, James (I5295)
 
338 Alexandre LeBlanc's age is recorded as follows:

1871 Census of Howley's Ferry age 28, born about 1842-1843
1881 Census of Boulardrie age 38, born about 1842-1843
1891 Census of Little Bras d'Or age 49, born about 1841-1842
1901 Census of Little Bras d'Or age 58, born September 25 1842
1911 Census of Little Bras d'Or age 69, born September 1842

Alexandre is very consistent with his age which strongly suggests Alexandre was born in September 1842.

There was a baptism for Élie LeBlanc, son of Paschal LeBlanc and Anne Dugast, on October 17 1842 in River Bourgeois. Élie's date of birth is recorded as September 23, 1842.

The 1861 Census of Howley's Ferry, Cape Breton County records 2 Males age 15 to 20 in Pascal LeBlanc's family (Polling District 10 Abstract 1 Family 17 as Phoscal White). Alexandre (with a date of birth in September 1842) and Mathurin/Matthew (with a date of birth in October 1844) are ages 15 to 20 in 1861.

Alexandre’s consistent ages in the various Censuses, date of birth in September 1842 in the 1901 and 1911 Censuses, and Alexandre and Mathurin/Matthew as the only two Males 15-20 in the 1861 Census support the conclusion Élie and Alexandre are the same person. 
LEBLANC, Alexandre (I2802)
 
339 Alfred Barnard published "The Noted Breweries of Great Britain and Ireland" in 1891 in which he records his visits to some of the largest breweries in the nation. This book includes the Pike Spicer Brewery in Penny Street, Old Portsmouth, which states:

William Pike, the founder of the firm of Pike, Spicer & Co., was born in the year 1691, at Poole, in Dorsetshire. By the death of his father, when quite a child he was left an orphan, and in the year 1705 was sent by his mother to Portsmouth, to be apprenticed to her cousin, a Mr. William Mudge. This gentleman, who had commenced business as a cooper as far back as the year 1661, was at this time in a large way of business as a brewer. His brewhouse was situate at the upper end of Penny Street, where the Cambridge Barracks now stand, and it was there that young Pike served his apprenticeship to the "art, mystery, or occupation of a cooper", as the deed quaintly sets out.

Victor Bonham-Carter’s biography of his family titled "In a Liberal Tradition" states (Page 21):

At the age of 25 he [Sir John Carter] had entered the distilling trade. A few years later he became manager of the brewery belonging to his maternal grand-father, William Pike, another remarkable Dissenter. Pike had begun life as a humble apprentice cooper, and then made his own way as a brewer in Portsmouth, with substantial premises between Penny Street and High Street. When he died in 1777, his landed property in Hampshire, Sussex, and the Isle of Wight amounted to over 5000 acres and was worth £100,000, a large sum in those days, and all exclusive of the value of the brewery. This fortune was equally divided between William Pike’s two daughters: Ann who married into the Bonham family of East and West Meon and Petersfield, and Susanna wife of John Carter II.

The Will of William Pike of Portsmouth in the (then) County of Southhampton Esquire dated 25 October 1774 and proved 28 May 1777 (PROB-11-1031-294) identifies his daughter Ann Bonham, his son in law John Carter, and his grandson Sir John Carter. So, this is the Will of William Pike, founder of the brewing firm of Pike, Spicer & Co.

The Will of William Pike of Portsmouth also identifies his sister Mary Lambert, his deceased brother Thomas Pike, and his deceased brother John Pike. William, son of Thomas Pike and Susanna Bird, has an older sister Mary, and older brothers Thomas and John. Thomas, son of Thomas Pike and Susanna Bird, died in 1741 based on his Will dated March 29 1741 and proved June 10 1741, and so is deceased in 1774. Also, Alfred Barnard states William Pike was born in 1691 in Poole and his father died when he was a child.

It is reasonable to conclude William Pike baptized January 31 1690 in Poole, son of Thomas Pike and Susanna Bird, went to Portsmouth after his father’s death to apprentice as a Cooper, and then became a brewer and the founder of the Pike Spicer Brewery in Portsmouth.

A transcript of William Pike’s 1774 Will is available on David Pike’s Family History & Genealogy Resources website (https://www.math.mun.ca/~dapike/family_history/).

William Pike’s three siblings are mentioned because bequests are made to their children. William Pike had one other brother (Samuel), and two other sisters (Margaret and an unknown sister). Perhaps, they are not mentioned in William Pike’s because they died and had no surviving children. 
PIKE, William (I5842)
 
340 Along with a letter dated August 23 2002, Irene (King) Vardy, daughter of Ernest King and Bennett Dalton, provided a copy of an agreement between James King and Thomas King concerning ‘a small plot or parcel of land situated in Little Catalina’ ‘formerly owned and occupied by the late John King father of both parties’. Unfortunately, the year of this agreement is not readable. This ‘small plot or parcel of land’ borders on land owned by Joseph Reid and Thomas Whelan. The agreement is witnessed by Joseph Stone and Joseph Reid.

Although James King died in 1886 prior to the start of Newfoundland Civil Registration, the Rooms Vital Statistics Death Records have the following for Thomas King:

Date of Death November 05 1902
Place of Death Catalina
Cause of Death Heart Failure
Religion Methodist
Age 78
Place of Birth Bradleys Cove
Place of Burial Catalina

So, Thomas King, brother of James King, was born about 1824 in Bradley’’'s Cove, and James King and Thomas King are the sons of John King.

The Rooms Parish Record Collection (PRC) records the baptism of Thomas Pike King, son of John (Planter) and Ann of Bradley’s Cove, on January 12 1825 at Western Bay Methodist. No date of birth is recorded for Thomas Pike King.

As the Western Bay Methodist baptism records are only available starting in 1817, it is not possible to verify the baptism of Thomas'’ brother James.

There is other support for James King and Thomas King of Little Catalina being born in Bradley’’'s Cove, based on the transcripts of Western Bay Methodist and Blackhead Methodist Church Records available from the Poingdestre/Puddester/Puddister Family Tree website (www.pudnewfoundland.ca/index.html) and on the Blackhead Methodist Church Records available on the Newfoundland and Labrador GenWeb.

There is no record of a Bradley’’'s Cove marriage of a Thomas King between 1816 and May 1876. Possibly, Thomas Pike King was married in his bride’'s parish. But, there is also no record of a Bradley’’'s Cove baptism of a child whose father is Thomas King after 1817. There is no record of a Bradley’’'s Cove burial of a Thomas King after 1816. With no record of a marriage, baptism, or burial; it is reasonable to believe Thomas Pike King left Bradley’’'s Cove.

There are two marriages of a James King’ of Bradley’’'s Cove after 1816:

1. James Penney King married Elizabeth Whealon of Bradley’’’'s Cove December 26 1839 in Bradley’’’'s Cove
2. James King married Agnes Thistle of Mulley’s Cove December 23 1840 in Blackhead

There is evidence James Penney King remained in Bradley’’'s Cove. William James, the son of James and Elizabeth King, was baptized February 17 1857 in Bradley’’'s Cove. The Newfoundland and Labrador GenWeb records a transcript of the Will of Patience Whealon, wife of Jacob Whealon, of Bradley’’'s Cove dated May 18 1860. Patience Whealon names James Penny King of Bradley’’'s Cove as her Executor. So, James Penney King is not James King of Little Catalina.

James King and Agnes Thistle have two children baptized in Bradley’’'s Cove:
1. Robert John King born Jan 18 1842 and baptized May 15 1842
2. Agnes Thistle King born Nov 4 1843 and baptized January 15 1844

Agnes (Thistle) King died on November 8 1843 in Bradley’’'s Cove. Her burial record states she ‘died in child birth’. Her burial was several days after the birth of her daughter Agnes Thistle King.

As noted above, there are only two marriages of a James King’ of Bradley’’'s Cove after 1816. So, there is no record of James King, husband of Agnes Thistle, remarrying in Bradley’’'s Cove. There is also no record of a Bradley’’'s Cove burial of a James King, or of a Robert King or Agnes King of a consistent age. As for Thomas King, it is reasonable to believe James King and his children left Bradley’’'s Cove.

A Robert King was buried at Little Catalina Methodist on May 8 1875 at age 34, implying a year of birth about 1840-1841. Robert King of Little Catalina married Jane Carpenter of Little Catalina on November 24 1871 in Little Catalina. Their only child Agnas (sic) was born February 4 1873 in Little Catalina. It seems too much of a coincidence this Robert King’'s date of birth is consistent with that of Robert John King of Bradley’’'s Cove, and the first child of this Robert King has the same name as the mother of the Robert John King of Bradley’’'s Cove. It seems likely this Robert King is Robert John King of Bradley’'s Cove.

The next youngest brother of Thomas Pike King of Bradley’’'s Cove is named Job Alexander, and he is baptized June 13 1830 in Bradley’'s Cove. There is a Job King buried at Little Catalina Methodist on January 6 1848 at age 17, implying a year of birth about 1830. This is consistent with the birth of John and Ann King's son Job Alexander. Thomas and Emily King of Little Catalina also name their first son Job Alexander when he is born in 1850.

It is reasonable to conclude Thomas Pike King and James King of Bradley’’'s Cove, sons of John and Ann King, moved from Bradley’'s Cove to Little Catalina.

The following is a transcription of the full Land Agreement between James King and Thomas King (sons of John King). Unfortunately, it is not possible to read the year of the date on my photocopy of this Agreement.

An agreement is hereby entered into be
- tween Thos King on the one part, & James King
on the other part. That in consequence of
the said Thos King giving the said James King
sole possession of a small plot or parcel of
land situated in Little Catalina, & now in the occupiancy (sic) of the said Thos King
and formerly owned and occupied by the late
John King father of both parties, that the said
James King on his part do by those presence agree
on his part to exact no further claim of the before
mentioned John King’s lands or property; said land
refered (sic) to measuring E ½ N- 5 purches & 3 feet by public road
North 2 W- 12 purches Bounded by Jos Reid W- 2 S 4 purches
& bound by Thos Whelan S- 1 E 12 purches & bounded by
Joseph Reid

May 20th Witnesses Joseph Stone Thomas King (his mark)
18?? Joseph Reid James King (his mark)

There is no John King listed in Lovell's 1871 Directory for Little Catalina, suggesting John King may have died prior to the taking of the 1871 Directory.

A May 16, 2002 email from William James (k.a. James) King, son of William James King and Aida Belmer, states: "… remind me to tell you about Audrey [daughter of Max Vardy and Irene King]. She has papers relating to the grant of the so-called King's Hill (the family lot) in 1851. I have a xerox copy".

A May 23, 2002 email from James King states: "Audrey has the original papers of the site granted to the Kings. King's Hill was the site in Little Catalina, where Irene [(King) Vardy] and the family grew up. Unfortunately, the top was cut off to fill something or other."

Irene (King) Vardy's letter dated August 23 2002 states: "I am enclosing a copy of an agreement, but it does not refer to the land on which Grandfather's house and my father's house were built. … Maybe Dad built on the same site where Grandfather's house was (on King's Hill). … Jim [William James King, son of William James King and Aida Belmer] was mixed up about the grant, because that just refers to the waterfront property". 
KING, John (I2101)
 
341 American State Papers - Documents, Legislative and Executive of the Congress of the United States, From the Second Session of the Eleventh to the Third Session of the Thirteenth Congress, Inclusive: Commencing November 27 1809 and Ending March 3, 1813 (Washington: Published by Gales and Seaton 1834) contains a report of Land Claims in the Eastern District of the Orleans Territory from the Treasury Department dated January 8, 1812. Source Source: S1261 (S1261)
 
342 An 1803 Land Petition from Abraham Laundry (sic) and Paul Forrest states:
50 acres of land at Little Arichat, extending from the land of John Labay Landrey and extending to land licenced to the House of Harmon Janvrin & Co.

The 1811 Census for Little Arichat records Abraham ’L'Andry with 1 Male 14-60 (Abraham Joseph Landry), 1 Female 14-60 (Ursule Forest), 3 Males under 14, 4 Females under 14, and 7 Unmarried Males and Females.

The 1813 Militia Roll for Little Arichat records Abraham Landre age 30 (sic) born Cape Breton Fisherman with 1 Woman, 3 Boys, and 5 Girls.

So, Abraham Landry likely resided in the Little Arichat area from at least 1803. Children of Abraham Joseph Landry and Ursule Forest born after 1803 were likely born in or near Little Arichat.

The Avery & Deslauriers website (in Rootsweb Family Trees) records one other child of Abraham Joseph Landry and Ursule Forest, namely Marie "Mariette" Landry who married Benjamin Thériot on January 10 1825 in Arichat. The sources identifying Marie "Mariette" Landry as the daughter of Abraham Joseph Landry and Ursule Forest are messages posted to the Isle Madame Listserve without further supporting detail.

There is some evidence to support Marie "Mariette" Landry, wife of Benjamin Thériot, being the daughter of Abraham Joseph Landry and Ursule Forest.

1. Benjamin Thériot (and Elizabeth Poirier) are the godparents for Alexis Benjamin, son of Abraham Landry and Domithilde LeBlanc, baptized March 1 1847 in Arichat
2. Benjamin Thériot (and Henriette Sacaloup) are the godparents for Paul Thomas, son of Meleme Poirier and Elizabeth Landry, baptized October 16 1847 in Arichat

The 1838 Census of Little Arichat records Benjamin Terrio Merchant with 2 Males under 6, 2 Females under 6, 1 Male 6-14, 1 Female 6-14, and 2 Females over 15 for a total of 9 persons.

Benjamin Thériot and Mariette Landry are witnesses at the marriage of Alexis Vincent, widower of Mary Landry, and Marguerite Thériot, widow of Michel Girouard, on August 12 1843 in Arichat.

Benjamin Thériot died before the marriage of his son Abraham Thériot and Justine Girouard, daughter of Joseph Girouard and Celeste LeBlanc, on January 8 1849 in Arichat.

The marriage of Simon Thériot, son of Benjamin Thériot and Marie Landry, and Sabine Forest, daughter of Benjamin Forest and Charlotte Poirier, on January 12 1852 in Arichat records Benjamin Thériot as deceased (i.e. "feu") but not Marie Landry, implying she is still alive. 
LANDRY, Abraham Joseph (I947)
 
343 An 1810 Land Petition from Charles Landrie states "Petitioner was born in New Brunswick, has lived thirty years in Arichat. He is now seventy years old, has nine children, seven of whom are in C.B. He asks a grant of the land on which he has long lived, and which adjoins land granted to Robin Luce & Co."

Is this Charles Landry the son of Jean-Baptiste Landry dit Labbé and Marie-Josèphe (dite Josette) LeBlanc born about 1742 (i.e. age 9 in the 1752 Census of Île Royale)?

The 1811 Census of Arichat records two Charles Landry's:

1. Gabl or Charles Landry:
Records 4 Males 14-60, 2 Females 14-60, 1 Male or Female over 60, 2 Males under 14, 1 Female under 14, and 7 Unmarried Males and Females. This family seems to include a husband and wife as well as a widow or a widower to account for the 3 not "unmarried" people. Gabl or Charles Landry, head of this family, is alive at the time of this Census.

The 1813 Militia Roll for Greater Arichat records Charles Landre age 50 born Cape Breton with 1 Woman, 2 Boys, and no Girls. Immediately below Charles Landre are Paul Landre age 17 and Charles Landre age 19; both with no Women, Boys, or Girls.

2. Charles Landry's widow:
Records 2 Males 14-60, 1 Female 14-60, 1 Male or Female over 60, and 3 Unmarried Males and Females. This family likely includes Charles Landry's widow (who is over 60) with her 2 sons and 1 daughter. Immediately following Charles Landry's widow is "Charles Landry her son" with 1 Male 14-60, 1 Female 14-60, 2 Males under 14, and 2 Unmarried Males and Females.

The 1813 Militia Roll for Greater Arichat records Charles Landre age 30 born Cape Breton with 1 Woman, 3 Boys, and no Girls. Immediately below Charles Landre are Joseph Landre age 27 with 1 Woman, no Boys, and no Girls; and John Landre age 22 with no Women, Boys, or Girls.

There are only 2 Charles Landry's in Arichat around 1810, and one is age 50 which is too young to be the Charles Landry who submitted the 1810 Land Petition at age 70. As the family of Jean Baptiste Landry dit Labbé and Marie Josèphe LeBlanc are known to be in the Isle Madame area around 1771 (through Father Bailly's Register), it is reasonable to conclude Charles Landry age 70 who submitted the 1810 Land Petition is the son of Jean Baptiste Landry dit Labbé and Marie Josèphe LeBlanc. 
LANDRY, Charles (I273)
 
344 An Ann Pavitt is a witness at the marriage of George Pavitt and Elizabeth Nottage married on March 9 1779 in Little Hallingbury. George Pavitt and Elizabeth Nottage signed. Ann Pavitt is not a witness at the marriages of other children of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins.

The Hertford Names Online (HNO) website records 3 marriages of an Ann Pavitt (or variant spelling) between 1775 and 1810 in Hertford. The HNO display does not indicate whether Ann Pavitt is a spinster or a widow.

1. Ann Pavitt of Little Hallingbury and James Hughes October 1 1779 in Bishop’s Stortford
2. Ann Pavitt and Matthew Palmer of Farnham July 2 1780 in Bishop’s Stortford
3. Ann Pavitt and Jos Culver March 12 1791 in Sawbridgeworth

The FreeReg website records 6 marriages of a spinster Ann Pavitt (or variant spelling) between 1775 and 1810 in Essex. The FreeReg transcript for the marriage of George Pavitt and Elizabeth Nottage does not record whether witness Ann Pavitt signed or made her mark. But, all the other known children of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins signed their names at various marriages. It is reasonable to believe Ann, daughter of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins, could also sign her name. This eliminates the following 4 Ann Pavitt marriages between 1775 and 1810 in Essex for which Ann Pavitt made her mark.

1. Ann Pavit of Little Hallingbury and George Markwell 1776 in Litttle Hallingbury
2. Ann Pavitt of Little Hallingbury and James Hews 1779 in Litttle Hallingbury
3. Ann Pavet of High Easter and William Warner 1785 in High Easter
4. Mary Ann Pavit of Writtle and William Osborne 1788 in Writtle

The FreeReg website does not record if there is a signature or mark for these 2 Ann Pavitt marriages.

1. Ann Paviett of South Weald and Thomas King 1783 in South Weald
2. Ann Pavitt of Good Easter and Daniel Rofe 1792 in Good Easter

Bishop’s Stortford is 17 miles north of South Weald, and 10 miles northwest of Good Easter.

Of all the above Ann Pavitt marriages, the only Ann Pavitt who seems to reside in Bishop’s Stortford is the one who marries Matthew Palmer of Farnham, Essex.

The FreeReg website records 2 baptisms for children of Matthew and Ann Palmer in St Mary the Virgin, Farnham, Essex:

1. Mary baptized May 16 1783
2. Matthew baptized July 26 1803

Having only 2 children 20 years apart is rare. The FreeReg website records the burial of Matthew, son of Matthew and Ann Palmer, on October 10 1803 in St Mary the Virgin, Farnham, Essex.

The FreeReg website records the marriage of Mary Palmer Single of Farnham and Samuel Spencer Single of Farnham on December 22 1807 in St Mary the Virgin, Farnham, Essex; with witnesses William Pavitt and George Pavitt.

Mary, daughter of Matthew and Ann Palmer, is the only Mary Palmer baptism recorded in the FreeReg website between 1760 and 1800 in Farnham, Essex.

It was common for children of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins to witness each other’s marriages. It is reasonable to conclude Ann Pavitt, wife of Matthew Palmer, is the daughter of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins, as William Pavitt and George Pavitt, sons of James Pavitt and Sarah Harkins, witnessed their niece Mary Palmer’s marriage to Samuel Spencer.

Ancestry’s 1841 Census of Farnham, Essex, England records Samuel Spencer age 60 Farmer, Mary Spencer age 58, William Spencer age 18, Samuel Spencer age 16, and Ann Palmer age 78 Independent; all born in County.

It is reasonable to conclude this is Ann Pavitt, widow of Matthew Palmer, residing with her daughter Mary Palmer, wife of Samuel Spencer, in Farnham. So, Ann Pavitt, widow of Mathew Palmer, died after this Census.

Ancestry’s 1851 Census of Stanstead, Hertford, England records Samuel Spencer age 70 Farmer born Essex Hadstock, wife Mary Spencer age 68 born Essex Farnham, visitor Elizabeth Barker age 70 (?) Annuitant born Essex Farnham, servant Mary Palmer age 19 born Essex Elsenham, and servant Maria Glassbrook age 76 born Herts Westmill; residing Alsa St., Stanstead.

Ann Pavitt, widow of Mathew Palmer, does not reside with her daughter Mary Palmer, wife of Samuel Spencer, in the 1851 Census. This suggests she may have died before this Census, or perhaps chose to remain in or near Farnham.

Ancestry’s 1851 Census of England does not record an Ann Palmer born 1762 +/- 10 years in either Essex or Hertford, or Ann Palmer born 1762 +/- 10 years residing in either Essex or Hertford.

Farnham is in the Bishop’s Stortford Registration District. There are 2 Ann Palmer deaths in the Bishop’s Stortford Registration District between 1841 and 1851, namely in 1841 July-September (Volume 6 Page 189) and 1847 October-December (Volume 6 Page 338). None of the other Ann Palmer deaths in Essex or Hertford between 1841 and 1851 occur in a Registration District that includes Farnham or Stanstead. 
PAVITT, Ann (I5820)
 
345 An article titled Jerseymen in Newfoundland in the Evening Telegram of St. John's, Newfoundland dated November 11 1914 (page 8) states regarding Mrs Catherine Pike (known as "Jersey Kitty”) that “She lived to the rare old age of 97 and left many descendants“.

David Pike’'’s Family History & Genealogy Resources website contains an image of and an audio file for the eroded tombstone of Catherine Pike age 81 died December 29 1805. She was born about 1724.

David Pike’'’s Family History & Genealogy Resources website records the burial of Catherine Pike of Carbonear age 74 on August 6 1845 in Carbonear Methodist. She was born about 1770-1771.

Neither of these Catherine Pike’'’s are close to 97 years old. 
UNKNOWN, Catherine (I6094)
 
346 Ancestry provides images of book Source Source: S1941 (S1941)
 
347 Ancestry's 1841 Census of Finchley, Middlesex, England records Aaron Laurence age 35 Tailor Not Born in County, Sarah age 35 Not Born in County, Joseph age 13 Born in County, William age 11 Born in County, Edward age 8 Born in County, Sarah age 6 Born in County, Aaron age 4 Born in County, and Alberta age 4 months Born in County; residing East End, Finchley (District 2 Page 4). So, Aaron Lawrence died after this Census, and was born about 1800-1805.

Ancestry's 1851 Census of Finchley, Middlesex, England records Sarah Lawrance age 43 Widow born Herts Caldecott and children Joseph age 23 Tailor born Middlesex Marylebone, William age 21 born St Pancras, Albert age 10 born Middlesex Finchley, and Emily age 3 born Middlesex Finchley; residing Hog Market, Finchley (District 2e Page 34). So, Aaron Lawrence died before this Census.

Ancestry's London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1916 records the baptism of Emily born April 19, daughter of Sarah Lawrence Widow, on June 20 1847 at Holy Trinity, Finchley, Barnet Borough, Middlesex (1846-1873 Image 2 of 97). So, Aaron Lawrence died after Emily's conception (i.e. likely in or after September 1846), and before June 20 1847.

The burial of Aaron Lawrence age 41 of Finchley on May 21 1847 is consistent with Aaron Lawrence's known period of death, his approximate year of birth, and his place of residence.

FamilySearch's England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 records 2 candidates for Aaron Lawrence, husband of Sarah Pavitt (born 1800-1810):

1. Aaron, son of Joseph and Sarah Lawrance, baptized June 17 1804 in Wombridge, Shropshire
2. Aaron, son of Randal and Margery Laurence, baptized January 20 1808 in Datchworth, Hertfordshire

Aaron Lawrence and Sarah Pavitt's first known son is named Joseph and their only known daughter is named Sarah. Aaron Lawrence and Sarah Pavitt have no children named Randal or Margery. 
LAWRENCE, Aaron (I5807)
 
348 Ancestry's 1871 Census of D'Escousse records Margaret Poirrier age 72 Widow in the same dwelling as Joseph Poirrier age 25 Fisherman, wife Phobe age 25, and Edward age 4; all born NS (Division 1 Page 10 Family 33-34).

Is this Margaret Poirrier age 72 the widow of Joseph Poirier?

The transcript of ’D'Escousse Parish records the marriage of Joseph Poirier, son of Joseph Poirier and Marguerite MacDonald, and Phoebe Kavanagh, daughter of Édouard Kavanagh and Euphemie Bonin, on January 22 1866 in ’D'Escousse. The witnesses are Damien Kavanagh and Adele Poirier.

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics records the birth of Edward, son of Joseph and Euphemia Poirier on October 25 1864 in ’D'Escousse. The informant is Euphemia Kavanagh.

It is reasonable to conclude the above census entry is for Marguerite McDonald, widow of Joseph Poirier, and her son Joseph and daughter in law Phobe along with Joseph and Phobe's son Edward. 
MCDONALD, Marguerite (I3708)
 
349 Ancestry's 1871 Census of Little Arichat records Simon LeBlanc age 34 Sea Captain, wife Mary age 33, and children Alfried (sic) age 10, Mary age 9, Emilia Ann age 7, Joseph age 6, and Sophia age 5; all born Nova Scotia.

Ancestry's Acadia, Canada,Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1754-1946 records the baptism of Alfred, son of Simon LeBlanc "fils de Simon (Gaetan)" and Marie Angélique LeBlanc, born December 20 1860 baptized December 22 1860 Arichat.

Ancestry's Acadia, Canada,Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1754-1946 records the baptism of Jeanne Émilie, daughter of Simon LeBlanc and Marie Angélique LeBlanc, born September 6 1863 baptized September 13 1863 Arichat.

Nova Scotia Historical Vital Statistics records the birth of Sophie Virgina, daughter of Simon LeBlanc (Mariner) and Mary Angeline (sic) LeBlanc of Little Arichat, born June 22 1866 in Little Arichat. (Registration Year: 1866 - Book: 1820 - Page: 12 - Number: 149)

It is reasonable to conclude the family of Simon age 34 Sea Captain and Mary LeBlanc age 33 in the 1871 Census of Little Arichat is the family of Simon LeBlanc and Marie Angélique LeBlanc, and Simon Leblanc died after this Census.

Ancestry's 1881 Census of West Arichat records Marie LeBlanc age 43 Widow, and children Alfred age 20, Marie age 19, Emilianne age 17, Joseph age 16, Sophronie age 9, and Casar (male) age 6; all born Nova Scotia.

Again, it is reasonable to conclude the family of Mary LeBlanc age 43 Widow in the 1881 Census of Little Arichat is the family of Simon LeBlanc and Marie Angélique LeBlanc, and Simon Leblanc died before this Census. 
LEBLANC, Simon (I4995)
 
350 Ancestry's 1911 Census of South Bolden, County of Durham records:

Robert Jackson Head age 37 Married Coal Miner Stone-work born Durham Beamish
Martha Jackson Wife age 36 born Cumberland Carlisle
Robert Jackson Son age 9 born Cumberland Carlisle
Mary Ann Brown Visitor age 73 Widow born Lancashire Preston

The presence of Mary Ann Brown age 73 Widow born Lancashire Preston in this Census suggests Martha, wife of Robert Jackson, may be Martha, daughter of Edward James Brown and Mary Ann Smith, born September-October 1874 in Carlisle.

There is an England Marriage Registration for Martha Brown age 25 Spinster of 4 Linton Street Carlisle, daughter of Edward Brown (Grocer Master), and Robert Jackson age 27 Bachelor Commercial Traveller of 52 Cecil Street Carlisle, son of Robert Jackson (Mechanical Engineer), on May 27 1901. The witnesses are Robert Sambridge, Sarah Ann Brown, and Edward Brown.

Martha Brown's age, and her father's name and occupation are consistent with her being the daughter of Edward James Brown and Mary Ann Smith. As well, witness Edward Brown may be Martha Brown's father or brother, and witness Sarah Ann Brown is likely Martha's sister.

It is reasonable to conclude Martha Brown, wife of Robert Jackson, is Martha, daughter of Edward James Brown and Mary Ann Smith. 
BROWN, Martha (I2153)
 

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